Last updated: March 19. 2014 10:59AM - 538 Views
Abby Cavenaugh acavenaugh@civitasmedia.com



This brochure, available to the Anson County general public, details what recyclables are accepted at the county's six convenience centers.
This brochure, available to the Anson County general public, details what recyclables are accepted at the county's six convenience centers.
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According a report released earlier this month by the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Anson County ranks nearly last in recycling. As a whole, North Carolina recorded the lowest per-capita rate for solid waste disposal in 2013 since measurement began in 1991. The low solid waste disposal rates mean that more people are recycling than ever before.


“Public recycling programs across the state are contributing to this trend by providing services that divert materials from disposal and return them to the state’s recycling economy,” the press release from DENR states. “The N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources collects data on disposal and public recycling programs each year, tracking progress being made in recycling efforts.”


Of North Carolina’s 100 counties, Anson ranks 98th in total public recycling and 99th in recovery of common household recyclables. Anson County utilities director Mike Sessions said that the data is often skewed because of the way it’s reported to the state by Waste Connections.


Albert Glenn of SCS Engineers out of Charlotte, said that the following external factors can affect the per capita recycling ranking:


1. Number and size of municipalities within the county (i.e. have household and business collection).


2. Size of the county and population density.


3. Have extensive recycling programs and staff.


4. Location of collection sites.


5. Types of businesses within a county.


“Most of the metro counties are usually at the top and the more rural counties are at the bottom [of the rankings],” Glenn explained. “The metro counties have more resources.”


Also, he pointed out that recycling is not mandatory, which can also affect the rankings. “Anson County does have a number of options available,” he said. “The Anson County utilities department and county management makes an asserted effort to educate and provide options to the public on recycling. Recently collection of used cooking oil was added at the landfill convenience collection center in Polkton.”


Anson County’s utilities department has also made brochures available for schools and the general public, detailing recycling options. There are six convenience centers throughout the county where citizens can drop off common recyclable items. They are:


Anson County Landfill


375 Dozer Drive, Polkton


704-694-6900


Ansonville


2244 Plank Road, Ansonville


704-826-6353


Burnsville


26 Jones Pond Road, Polkton


(704) 826-6357


Gatewood


860 Old U.S. 52 South, Wadesboro


704-694-9375


Lilesville


2668 Haileys Ferry Road, Lilesville


704-848-4549


White Store


5574 Union Church Road, Polkton


704-272-8474


All six convenience centers are open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays and Saturdays. The Anson County Landfill also accepts electronics, appliances, used motor and transmission oil, yard waste, furniture, used tires and used batteries.


For more information about recycling in Anson County, contact utilities director Mike Sessions at 704-694-5208.

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